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Alexander Hamilton Quotes

Here are quotes by one of America's greatest founding fathers, Alexander Hamilton, and related quotations about America's founding. For more history, see Founding Fathers.

Founding Fathers Quotes

There is something so far-fetched and so extravagant in the idea of danger to liberty from the militia that one is at a loss whether to treat it with gravity or with raillery; whether to consider it as a mere trial of skill, like the paradoxes of rhetoricians; as a disingenuous artifice to instill prejudices at any price; or as the serious.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 29, January 10, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

This balance between the National and State governments ought to be dwelt on with peculiar attention, as it is of the utmost importance. It forms a double security to the people. If one encroaches on their rights they will find a powerful protection in the other. Indeed, they will both be prevented from overpassing their constitutional limits by a certain rivalship, which will ever subsist between them.

Alexander Hamilton, speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 17, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

This process of election affords a moral certainty that the office of President will seldom fall to the lot of any many who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 68, March 14, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

To cherish and stimulate the activity of the human mind, by multiplying the objects of enterprise, is not among the least considerable of the expedients, by which the wealth of a nation may be promoted.

Alexander Hamilton, Report on Manufactures, December 1791

Founding Fathers Quotes

To grant that there is a supreme intelligence who rules the world and has established laws to regulate the actions of his creatures; and still to assert that man, in a state of nature, may be considered as perfectly free from all restraints of law and government, appears to a common understanding altogether irreconcilable. Good and wise men, in all ages, have embraced a very dissimilar theory. They have supposed that the deity, from the relations we stand in to himself and to each other, has constituted an eternal and immutable law, which is indispensably obligatory upon all mankind, prior to any human institution whatever. This is what is called the law of nature....Upon this law depend the natural rights of mankind.

Alexander Hamilton, The Farmer Refuted, February 23, 1775

Founding Fathers Quotes

To judge from the history of mankind, we shall be compelled to conclude that the fiery and destructive passions of war reign in the human breast with much more powerful sway than the mild and beneficent sentiments of peace; and that to model our political systems upon speculations of lasting tranquility would be to calculate on the weaker springs of human character.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

To model our political system upon speculations of lasting tranquility, is to calculate on the weaker springs of the human character.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 34, January 4, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

War, like most other things, is a science to be acquired and perfected by diligence, by perseverance, by time, and by practice.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 25, December 21, 1787

Founding Fathers Quotes

Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be, that there is not sufficient virtue among men for self-government; and that nothing less than the chains of despotism can restrain them from destroying and devouring one another.

Alexander Hamilton and Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 55, February 15, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests, to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 71

Founding Fathers Quotes

When you assemble from your several counties in the Legislature, were every member to be guided only by the apparent interest of his county, government would be impracticable. There must be a perpetual accommodation and sacrifice of local advantage to general expediency.

Alexander Hamilton, speech at the New York Ratifying Convention, June, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

Wherever indeed a right of property is infringed for the general good, if the nature of the case admits of compensation, it ought to be made; but if compensation be impracticable, that impracticability ought to be an obstacle to a clearly essential reform.

Alexander Hamilton, Vindication of the Funding System, 1792

Founding Fathers Quotes

While the constitution continues to be read, and its principles known, the states, must, by every rational man, be considered as essential component parts of the union; and therefore the idea of sacrificing the former to the latter is totally inadmissible.

Alexander Hamilton, speech to the New York Ratifying Convention, June 24, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

Whoever attentively considers the different departments of power must perceive, that, in a government in which they are separated from each other, the judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 78, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice without constraint.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 15

Founding Fathers Quotes

Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions that cannot be observed, because they know that every break of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which out to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 25, December 21, 1787

Founding Fathers Quotes

[H]owever weak our country may be, I hope we shall never sacrifice our liberties.

Alexander Hamilton

Founding Fathers Quotes

[H]owever weak our country may be, I hope we shall never sacrifice our liberties.

Alexander Hamilton, Report on a National Bank, December 13, 1790

Founding Fathers Quotes

[The Judicial Branch] may truly be said to have neither FORCE nor WILL, but merely judgment; and must ultimately depend upon the aid of the executive arm even for the efficacy of its judgments.

Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 78, 1788

Founding Fathers Quotes

[T]he Constitution ought to be the standard of construction for the laws, and that wherever there is an evident opposition, the laws ought to give place to the Constitution. But this doctrine is not deducible from any circumstance peculiar to the plan of convention, but from the general theory of a limited Constitution.

Alexander Hamilton, Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 81, 1788



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